Do I need a Total Hip Replacement?

A total hip replacement is one of the most successful surgeries of modern medicine. This procedure is very effective for improving range of motion and relieving pain. The orthopedic surgeon in Chandler AZ follows certain guidelines to determine of you are ready for a total hip replacement.

The main goals of hip replacement are to stabilized the hip and offer pain relief. Leg-length equality is a Hip painpriority after the first two goals are established. Hip replacement parts in the U.S. are most often press-fit into the bone. To limit small cracks in the bone, the surgeon uses special implants and techniques.

Conservative Treatment Measures

Patients with hip arthritis or injury are often managed with conservative treatments. The orthopedic specialist will not perform a total hip replacement unless you have failed with these measures:

  • Physical therapy – Used to strengthen weak hip muscles and improve hip function, physical therapy involves strategic exercises. Many patients with hip arthritis often respond to physical therapy.
  • Corticosteroid injections – The doctor can injection the hip joint with an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid solution. These injections are usually given in a series of 3, which are spaced 3-4 months apart.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs – Acetaminophen is the gold standard drug for arthritis. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, can help alleviate the pain associated with inflammation.

Candidates for Total Hip Replacement

The Arizona orthopedic surgeon will decide if or not you are ready for a total hip replacement. Candidacy is based on:

  • Groin, hip, buttock, and knee pain – Patients with serious hip arthritis often have pain deep down in the groin region. This pain is relieved with a hip replacement. In addition, knee pain can occur because nerves that supply the knees run by each hip. When affected by inflammation, the nerves canstockphoto13092914can cause knee pain. Buttock and hip pain also can occur.
  • Bone-on-bone arthritis – The orthopedic surgeon will take some x-rays to see if the bone ends of the hip are touching. Pain occurs when the femur ball (thigh bone) does not fit properly in the socket.
  • Marked interference with daily activities – Surgery is considered when you have marked interference with daily activities. Patients will have trouble climbing stairs, putting on socks and shoes, and may need a cane for walking.
  • Trouble sleeping – Hip pain can affect ability to sleep, despite the use of pain medications.
  • Ability to participate in recovery – The patient having a total hip replacement must be able to participate in the rehabilitation program. Recovery takes around 3-6 weeks, and involves intense exercises and strengthening maneuvers. The doctor will consider a person’s ability to participate in the recovery process.

Total Hip Replacement Candidates

In years past, orthopedic surgeons in AZ reserve hip replacement surgery for persons age 60 years and older. This was because older people are less active and will not put stress on the artificial hip as a younger person would. In recent years, doctors have found that total hip replacement is useful for younger persons as well. New technology has improved surgical techniques and prosthetic components, allowing the new hip to withstand more strain and stress.

Hip replacement surgery involves a new hip that can last for as long as 20 years. A person’s overall health status and activity level are important in predicting the success of total hip replacement. A recent study shows that people who choose to have this surgery before advanced joint deterioration occurs tend to have an easier time with recovery.

The top orthopedic surgeons in Arizona at OSPI offer hip and knee replacements which are top notch. Often they are outpatient, allowing for rapid recovery getting people back to work and recreational activities fast! Call us today.

Resources

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (2016). Questions and answers about hip replacement. Retrieved from: http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/hip_replacement/

 

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