Tag Archive: hip specialist

Recovery after Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

Anterior hip replacement is a less invasive approach to hip joint surgery. With the anterior approach to total hip replacement, the orthopedic  surgeon in Gilbert AZ accesses the joint from the anterior (front) of the hip as opposed to the lateral (side) or posterior (back). The anterior approach allows the Arizona hip surgeon to make repairs and replacements without detaching tendons, muscles, or soft tissue.

Small Incision

The anterior approach to hip replacement was first described in the 1940s. This approach is gaining in popularity, and advocates for anterior approach total hip replacement consider its advantages to be earlier restoration of walking, low dislocation rates, and muscle-sparing ability. The ModularEndoprosthesisprocedure begins with the patient lying on his/her back. The surgical incision is slightly lateral to the front superior iliac spine of the pelvis. The 4- to 5-inch incision runs toward the lateral aspect of the ipsilateral knee. After moving soft tissue and muscle, replacement is made.

Because the anterior total hip replacement surgery uses a small incision, and muscles are moved rather than cut, the result is less trauma and damage to the hip soft tissues. Recovery time is usually faster with the anterior approach than traditional surgery, and patients report less post-operative pain. After only 2-3 weeks, patients begin walking without assistance, which is compared to 5-6 weeks with posterior hip replacement surgery.

Length of Hospital Stay

After the minimally invasive hip replacement, you will stay 1-4 days in the hospital. You may stay longer if you have serious health conditions, severe hip arthritis, and complications during the procedure. The length of stay varies from patient-to-patient, but the anterior approach to hip replacement is usually related to a shorter length of hospital stay than the posterior or lateral approaches.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy begins the day of surgery. To strengthen the hip joint, you must do small exercises, such as contracting buttock and leg muscles and ankle pumps. The therapist works with you to learn exercises that help regain full hip movement. You will work with the therapist two times each day. Once you return home, the physical therapist will see you 3-4 times each week.

 

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Home Recovery

After you leave the hospital, you should have family or friends stay with you for a few days. You will need help with errands and household activities. In addition, you cannot drive for 2-4 weeks, so you will need transportation home from the hospital, to follow-up appointments, and to the pharmacy. It is also important to stock up on easy to prepare foods, such as frozen, canned, and premade meals.

Incision Care

Your anterior incision will be closed with staples or sutures, which are removed around 10-14 days after surgery. The surgical site will be numb, sore, bruised, and/or swollen for a few days. You may experience itching or pulling of the incision site as well. We recommend using an icepack for 10-20 minutes several times a day to relieve discomfort. In addition, avoid using any lotions or creams on the hip area. To keep the incision clean and dry, avoid showering until your wounds are healed. You can bathe, however.

Physical Activity

Being physically active is an important aspect for recovery. Within 2-4 weeks, you will be able to resume your daily routine and normal activities. During the first week, you will start walking with a walker and advance to using a cane. To avoid falls and injuries, you should only walk in areas where there are handrails, no loose rugs, and no cords. You may begin driving after 2-3 weeks, depending on how you progress.

 

OSPI offers the top hip specialists in Arizona, specifically the East Valley. Hip replacements done by the anterior approach need an expert to be done well. Call OSPI today, most insurance is accepted!

Do I need a Total Hip Replacement?

A total hip replacement is one of the most successful surgeries of modern medicine. This procedure is very effective for improving range of motion and relieving pain. The orthopedic surgeon in Chandler AZ follows certain guidelines to determine of you are ready for a total hip replacement.

The main goals of hip replacement are to stabilized the hip and offer pain relief. Leg-length equality is a Hip painpriority after the first two goals are established. Hip replacement parts in the U.S. are most often press-fit into the bone. To limit small cracks in the bone, the surgeon uses special implants and techniques.

Conservative Treatment Measures

Patients with hip arthritis or injury are often managed with conservative treatments. The orthopedic specialist will not perform a total hip replacement unless you have failed with these measures:

  • Physical therapy – Used to strengthen weak hip muscles and improve hip function, physical therapy involves strategic exercises. Many patients with hip arthritis often respond to physical therapy.
  • Corticosteroid injections – The doctor can injection the hip joint with an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid solution. These injections are usually given in a series of 3, which are spaced 3-4 months apart.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs – Acetaminophen is the gold standard drug for arthritis. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, can help alleviate the pain associated with inflammation.

Candidates for Total Hip Replacement

The Arizona orthopedic surgeon will decide if or not you are ready for a total hip replacement. Candidacy is based on:

  • Groin, hip, buttock, and knee pain – Patients with serious hip arthritis often have pain deep down in the groin region. This pain is relieved with a hip replacement. In addition, knee pain can occur because nerves that supply the knees run by each hip. When affected by inflammation, the nerves canstockphoto13092914can cause knee pain. Buttock and hip pain also can occur.
  • Bone-on-bone arthritis – The orthopedic surgeon will take some x-rays to see if the bone ends of the hip are touching. Pain occurs when the femur ball (thigh bone) does not fit properly in the socket.
  • Marked interference with daily activities – Surgery is considered when you have marked interference with daily activities. Patients will have trouble climbing stairs, putting on socks and shoes, and may need a cane for walking.
  • Trouble sleeping – Hip pain can affect ability to sleep, despite the use of pain medications.
  • Ability to participate in recovery – The patient having a total hip replacement must be able to participate in the rehabilitation program. Recovery takes around 3-6 weeks, and involves intense exercises and strengthening maneuvers. The doctor will consider a person’s ability to participate in the recovery process.

Total Hip Replacement Candidates

In years past, orthopedic surgeons in AZ reserve hip replacement surgery for persons age 60 years and older. This was because older people are less active and will not put stress on the artificial hip as a younger person would. In recent years, doctors have found that total hip replacement is useful for younger persons as well. New technology has improved surgical techniques and prosthetic components, allowing the new hip to withstand more strain and stress.

Hip replacement surgery involves a new hip that can last for as long as 20 years. A person’s overall health status and activity level are important in predicting the success of total hip replacement. A recent study shows that people who choose to have this surgery before advanced joint deterioration occurs tend to have an easier time with recovery.

The top orthopedic surgeons in Arizona at OSPI offer hip and knee replacements which are top notch. Often they are outpatient, allowing for rapid recovery getting people back to work and recreational activities fast! Call us today.

Resources

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (2016). Questions and answers about hip replacement. Retrieved from: http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/hip_replacement/

 

Hip Replacement Surgery in Gilbert and Chandler AZ

Hip replacement surgery, also called total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a procedure reserved for Hip painpatients who have severe hip joint damage or degeneration. The disability and pain from arthritis can impair your ability to perform daily activities and influence your quality of life.

How long does total hip replacement last?

In general, a total hip replacement lasts over 20 years. However, it is best to consider failure rates. If you have a total hip replacement, you have a 90-95% chance that the joint will hold up for 10 years, and an 80-85% chance that it will last for 20 years. As technology improves, these numbers will go up.

Are all joint implants the same?

The majority of joint implants are similar, with the AZ orthopedic surgeon using the design that works best, lasts longest, and has the fewest complications. However, the variable to consider is the bearing surface, which is the ball and liner that attaches to the stem and the cup that adheres to the bone. Balls may be composed of ceramic or metal, and the liner can be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic.

Which approach is best?

The surgeon may perform one of the following approaches:

  • Posterior approach – This is the most common approach, and it involves surgery done from Hip-Replacement-Anterior-Approach-Incisionthe posterior (back) region of the hip.
  • Mini posterior approach – Done from the back of the hip with smaller incisions and less tissue trauma.
  • Anterior approach – Performed from the front aspect of the hip.
  • Lateral approach – Less common approach done from the side of the hip.

The Board Certified Gilbert orthopedic doctors at OSPI offer the anterior approach in a minimally invasive fashion. This reduces postoperative complications and speeds up rehab.

What type of anesthesia will I be given?

Hip replacement surgery can be performed using both general and regional anesthesia. With general anesthesia, the patient is put to sleep. With regional anesthesia (spinal, epidural, or nerve block), only a portion of the body is paralyzed. This type of anesthesia reduces complications and improves recovery time.

Is this a minimally invasive surgery?

Arthroscopic hip surgery is a minimally invasive procedure, which means smaller incisions and less tissue disruption below the incision. Less muscle cutting is involved with a minimally invasive procedure, as is less tendon detachment from the bone.

How big is the incision be and will it leave a scar?

The size of the incision depends on many factors, such as the patient’s weight and height, the surgeon’s requirements, and the complexity of the procedure. Smaller incisions mean less canstockphoto24680715(1)scarring. The scar will heal after a few weeks, and then change in appearance over time. However, most patients have a small scar for the remainder of their lives.

How long do I have to stay at the hospital?

Because hip replacement surgery involves anesthesia and immediate rehabilitation, you will stay at the hospital overnight, and possibly, for an additional 1-3 days. This depends on your rehabilitation protocol, how fast you progress, your age, your medical conditions, and the surgeon’s preference.

How soon before I can walk?

After a total hip replacement, most surgeons recommend that you get up and start moving immediately. Most people can walk with a walker the day following the procedure and with a cane in 2-3 weeks. Most people who undergo THA are able to fully participate in daily activities after 6 weeks. By the third month, many patients have regained strength and endurance and can fully participate in usual activities.

What can I expect with physical therapy?

You will receive physical therapy during your hospital stay, and for 1-4 weeks after you go home. Much of the therapy involves general stretching and muscle strengthening exercises, as well as learning to use assistive devices, such as the walker, cane, and hand held devices. The therapist works with you to return to work activities, but if you have a physically demanding job, you may have to wait 2-3 months. For physical therapy treatment contact our expect

What restrictions follow the surgery?

Depending your individual case (condition, type of surgery, extent of repair, etc.), you may have certain rehabilitation restrictions. Most surgeons give you instructions on which positions of the hip increase your risk for dislocation, and these positions should be avoided. After 6 weeks, the restrictions are lifted. In addition, you must avoid high-impact activities, such as long distance running, skiing, and basketball.

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