Tag Archive: shoulder surgeon

Total Joint Replacement at OSPI – AZ Orthopedic Surgeons

Total Joint Arthroplasties

Joint replacement surgery, also called a total joint arthroplasty (TJA), is a common procedure used to relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore quality of life. There are many types of joint replacement procedures. Joint replacement surgery is used to replace damaged cartilage and any loss of bone structure.

The procedure is a resurfacing of the damaged joint, which relies on the ligaments and muscles for function and support. The replacement joint is called a prosthesis, which can be made of cobalt chrome, stainless steel, titanium, ceramic, or polyethylene.

Osteoarthritis and Joint Dysfunction

The most common conditions that cause joint dysfunction are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Many factors contribute to joint degeneration and damage, which leads to arthritis. Factors include:

  • Developmental abnormalities of the jointknee replacement
  • Heredity
  • Minor repetitive injuries
  • Abnormal cartilage metabolism
  • Severe trauma to the cartilage
  • Being overweight

Total Knee Replacement

The knee is the body’s largest joint, and it is necessary for walking, climbing stairs, and everyday activities. With age, excessive weight, and wear-and-tear from arthritis, the knee joint becomes damaged, making movement painful.

In a total knee replacement, the Gilbert orthopedic surgeon removes the degenerated cartilage surfaces at the ends of the shinbone (tibia) and thighbone (femur), and then replaces these areas with metal or plastic components. A spacer is inserted between the components so the joint will glide in a smooth fashion.

Patients who are candidates for a knee replacement are those with a knee deformity, people with chronic knee inflammation, persons who do not respond to conservative treatment, and anyone with limited movement of the knee. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports, in the U.S., more than 719,000 total knee replacements are performed each year.

Total Hip Replacement

The hip is a mobile joint, formed with a ball-and-socket. The ball and socket are both coveredcanstockphoto24680715(1) with articular cartilage, which can wear down from injury, trauma, or arthritis. This causes pain and limited mobility.

A total hip replacement involves removing the ball of the joint (femur head) and replacing it with a metal stem that attaches to the thigh bone. The damaged area of the socket is also replaced with a metal socket, and between these implants, the surgeon places a spacer that helps the joint glide easily. Candidates for a total hip replacement are patients who experience significant hip pain and stiffness, as well as people who have not responded to non-surgical methods. According to the CDC, there are more than 330,000 total hip replacements performed each year in the U.S.

Shoulder Joint Replacement

The shoulder joint consists of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), the clavicle (collarbone), and the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint with cartilage on the ends of the structures to help them glide smoothly against one another. This cartilage breaks down due to arthritis and trauma, causing significant pain and loss of function. A total shoulder joint replacement involves use of prosthetic bone ends to replace the damaged areas. This surgical procedure is used for patients who do not respond to medications and those who have symptoms at rest.

Success Rates of Joint Replacement

The success rate of total joint replacement surgery is quite high. The need for repeat operation in the first ten years is less than 5%. Most replaced joints last from 10-20 years.

The Board Certified hip, knee and shoulder joint replacement surgeons at OSPI are highly skilled in the procedures. The Gilbert orthopedic surgeons offer contemporary, minimally invasive procedures that decrease postoperative pain, bleeding and speed recovery.

Most insurance is accepted at OSPI, call (480) 899-4333 today!

Shoulder Arthroscopy and Debridement with Top Arizona Orthopedic MDs

Shoulder arthroscopic debridement is a procedure used to relieve pain and restore function to the shoulder joint. This surgery is best for patients who have rotator cuff tears that cannot be fully repaired. The procedure is followed by a long course of physical therapy.Shoulder Surgeon Mesa AZ

What is debridement?

Debridement is the process of removing damaged tissue and debris from the shoulder joint. Considered a minimally invasive procedure, shoulder joint debridement involves use of small tools to surgically clean the area.

Who is a candidate for shoulder arthroscopic debridement?

Tissue damage of the shoulder joint occurs due to various reasons. The most common reason for tissue damage is degeneration from osteoarthritis. However, damage can also occur due to trauma or injury. As the tissue of the joint deteriorates with normal wear-and-tear as the body ages, debris and loose tissues form in the joint. This can lead to impaired shoulder range of motion and significant pain.

What is the success rate of shoulder arthroscopy and debridement?

Based on clinical studies, shoulder arthroscopic debridement has over a 70% success rate with orthopedic surgeons in Gilbert and Chandler AZ. This success rate is based on reduction in pain and return to normal activities.

What type of anesthesia is involved?

Shoulder ArthroscopyShoulder arthroscopy and debridement is usually done using general anesthesia, and the total procedure takes approximately one hour. For pain relief after the procedure, a local anesthetic and or regional anesthetic (nerve block) may be used. Regional anesthesia is used for patients who have certain medical conditions and those who wish to avoid post-operative side effects.

How do I prepare for the shoulder debridement procedure?

Two weeks before your scheduled surgery, make the Chandler orthopedic surgeon aware of all your medications, and assure that he has copies of your medical records. Don’t smoke, avoid alcohol, and pass on over-the-counter medications. Do not eat or drink the night before the procedure, and leave valuables at home. Arrange to have someone to drive you home from the hospital. When you arrive, a nurse will have you sign a consent form, change into a gown, and place an IV in your arm to administer necessary medications.

How is the surgery done?

The sports medicine surgeon first makes several small incisions around the shoulder. The arthroscope is inserted so the doctor can see inside on a monitor. The first part of the procedure involves evaluating the shoulder for damaged tendons and arthritis of the joint. When shoulder ospi_smallmovement is restricted, the ligaments are released.

If the biceps tendon is trapped or painful when the arm is lifted, the tendon is also released. In order for the tendon to move adequately, a small portion of bone may need to be removed as well. After all debridement is done, the incisions are closed with sutures, and the area is covered with bandages. Then, the shoulder is placed in a sling.

What does recovery involve?

After the procedure, you are moved to a recovery room where a nurse monitors your condition for several minutes. Most patients will stay overnight in the hospital. The next day, a physical therapist works with you to teach necessary exercises for regaining strength and joint function. The sling is worn for 2-3 weeks, and at this time, you may use your hand as needed. After the sling comes off, you can drive and gradually return to usual activities over the next 3-6 weeks.

All about Partial Shoulder Replacement Surgery

The shoulder essentially comprises of a ball and socket joint, where the round end of one bone fits into the socket at the end of another bone. This is the joint which is responsible for both, arm and shoulder movement.

When it comes to replacing an arthritic or injured shoulder, the rate is highly uncommon as compared to knee or hip replacements. This means that the surgery rate is also very low. However, this doesn’t mean that an injured or arthritic shoulder cannot be treated by surgery.

Partial replacement surgery is generally recommended by Gilbert orthopedic surgeons to patients suffering from pain accompanied by arthritis or a traumatic injury to the shoulder. Exceptional care should therefore, be taken by athletes, because their shoulder joints are subjected to a lot of wear and tear, which over time, can lead to a problem.

That being said, the benefits that can be derived from other joint replacement procedures are the same as that of a shoulder replacement, i.e. restoration of normal joint movement and relief from joint pain.

What Is Included In A Partial Shoulder Replacement Procedure?

This procedure is normally used when the glenoid socket doesn’t need to be replaced because it’s still intact. Instead; in a partial shoulder replacement, the humerus is operated upon, replacing the head and implanting the humeral component.    

This means that, during the procedure, there is no need for a plastic socket, less bone is removed as compared to other surgical procedures, and it requires a smaller incision.

Because every shoulder is unique, the very first step that you should take if experiencing shoulder pain is to consult with an orthopedic surgeon in Chandler and ask for an assessment. Then the surgeon will perform an examination to find out what the condition of your shoulder is. Some common shoulder problems that require surgery are:

  • Instability of the Shoulder
  • Shoulder Tendinitis
  • Fractured Collarbone
  • Full Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear

Orthopedic Evaluation: What to Expect

The evaluation and assessment of the shoulder covers 3 essential components:

A Medical History: Typically about current complaints, the duration of symptoms, pain and limitations faced by the patient, any injuries and past surgical or non-surgical treatments.

A Physical Examination: This is done to assess the tenderness, swelling, range of motion, weakness or strength, instability, and/or deformity of the affected shoulder.

Diagnostic Tests: X-rays of the shoulder are taken in various positions and in a series of movements. An MRI scan can also be helpful in effectively making an assessment of soft tissues in the shoulder. A CT scan is sometimes used to evaluate the various bones within the shoulder.

At the end of the evaluation and assessment, your orthopedic surgeon will review the results and discuss the best treatment options with you, both surgical and non-surgical. If you opt for the surgical option of treatment, the doctor will then inform you regarding all the risks and complications that may occur, during and after surgery.

OSPI offers the top shoulder surgeons in the East Valley including Gilbert, Chandler and Mesa AZ. These shoulder specialists are Board Certified and Fellowship Trained. Call today for help with all your shoulder pain needs!

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