Can Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy Heal Sports Injuries?

You may have heard of PRP or Platelet Rich Plasma therapy being used for pro athletes like Tiger Woods. PRP therapy helped him recover from ACL surgery that would have taken a long time to heal otherwise.

PRP therapy is part of regenerative medicine that utilizes the body’s natural ability to heal. PRP can help heal and even regenerate damaged or degenerating tissues, providing a great alternative to surgery.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

Platelets are blood cells that contain proteins, growth factors, and other components that stimulate healing. Platelets also attract stem cells to the affected site, stimulating healing and new tissue growth.

Platelet rich plasma or PRP is your body’s own blood plasma and concentrated platelets. Platelets in PRP are 5-10 times that found normally in blood.

Conditions treated by PRP

PRP or Platelet Rich Plasma therapy can potentially treat a wide range of sports and other injuries that cause joint, tendon and ligament pain. These include –

  • Joint pain
  • Degenerative Joint Disease
  • Ligament and muscle injuries
  • Tendonitis
  • Partial tendon tears

PRP treatments have proven highly effective and successful. They help to relieve pain and avoid disability, down time and risks associated with major surgery. Recovery from PRP therapy is fast, accompanied only by some soreness in the treated area, that passes away quickly.

To learn more about PRP Therapy for treating sports and other injuries and conditions, call OSPI Arizona in Gilbert, AZ at 480-899-4333. OSPI’s Board Certified orthopedic surgeons have extensive experience and expertise in regenerative and sports medicine, general orthopedics and joint replacement surgery.

For Patients with Lymphoedema – Decongestive Lymphatic Therapy Could be Key

What is Lymphoedema?

Lymphoedema is a chronic disorder characterized by swelling tissue (usually a lump) with fluid rich in proteins. It can either be a developmental problem (meaning there is no cause per se) or secondary and associated with some sort of precipitating event. These secondary causes include:

● Surgical causes:
○ Sometimes removal of lymph nodes – such as in breast cancer surgery – can result in lymphoma
● Radiation treatment for certain cancers can scar the nodes and vessels.
● Cancer. Certain types of cancer can invade the lymphatic vessels and this can result in lymphoedema
● Infection often invades the lymph nodes and causes them to swell.

If you have lymphoedema you might suffer from a number of symptoms including:

● Swelling of a limb. This can occur in part of the leg or arm or the entire limb.
● The affected limb will typically cause heaviness and tightness
● The limb will have restricted movement
● There may be aching or discomfort
● There may be recurrent infections of the surrounding skin (cellulitis)
● There might be a hardening of the skin.

What is decongestive lymphatic therapy?

A decongestive lymphatic drainage is a specialized form of physical therapy offered at a number of specialist centers across the country. The decongestive lymphatic therapy consists of four distinct components:

● Compression bandages are applied to complement the exercises in the therapy to move fluid out of the limb.
● Skincare is undertaken to reduce the chances of skin breakdown (which is a big infection risk in these patients)
● Exercises will be undertaken with a physiotherapist to improve the lymph drainage in the affected limb
● The therapist will also undertake specialist massage techniques known as manual lymphatic drainage that stimulated the flow of fluid through the system and reduces the swelling.

The treatment is intensive and can be every day for a number of weeks. After this initial phase patients typically move to the maintenance phase whereby they maintain good lymph flow with exercise and home self-massage techniques.

Does decongestive lymphatic therapy work?

There is a growing body of literature that suggests decongestive lymphatic therapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with lymphedema that resulted following breast cancer surgery (eg a mastectomy with axillary clearance). A study conducted at the University of Texas looked to see whether the therapy worked on this patient group even if they had had the therapy before. They found that in both patients who had had the therapy before and naive patients, there was a statistically significant reduction in the mean size of the limb. This is great news for sufferers!

If you our somebody you know is suffering from lymphoedema, either following a surgical procedure or for development reasons – contact a specialist physiotherapy center who and provide one to one support and a personalized treatment plan to help reduce the swelling and get you back on your feet.

Dizziness Found to be Significantly Reduced in Patients Undergoing Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy

Dizziness is one of the most common complaints a family practitioner will deal with day to day and some estimates suggest that 1 in 3 of us will have vestibular dysfunction (causing dizziness) at some point over a 3 year period.

Patients who have dizziness because of a peripheral cause (aka the balance system outside of the brain) report symptoms that include:

● Dizziness
● Imbalance
● Some visual disturbance

There are a number of causes of unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction, some rarer than others. These include:

● Meniere’s disease
● Vestibular neuritis (often caused by a viral infection)
● Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (known as BPPV)

What is vestibular rehabilitation therapy?

For patients that are having trouble with balance, there are a number of medication available. However, these can be used to more effect in combination with physiotherapy from specialist centers across the united states. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is done a trained and specialized physiotherapist who will assess your needs and recommend a personalized blend of different exercises and retraining regimes to help your particular balance problems.

These can involve a whole host of different techniques but a few are listed below:

● The Epley maneuver: This is highly effective for those patients suffering from benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).
● Gait drills: these can help you with walking
● Balance retraining guidance: these exercises help hone your balance so that dizziness and vertigo don’t take you off guard.
● Strength training: training groups of muscles can help the body respond to imbalance. Don’t worry – this isn’t bodybuilding! It just gets your core muscles to a point where they can react appropriately to instability.
● There are also other therapies that include symptom management (accepting you have balance issues and psychologically getting over this) and relaxation therapies

Does vestibular rehabilitation therapy?

Evidence-based medicine counts for a lot in this 21st century. Treatments that don’t have a good evidence base quickly fall by the wayside. Thankfully vestibular rehabilitation therapy has a large and growing body of research suggesting how beneficial it is. Many doctors consider a Cochrane review to be the highest form of evidence. Vestibular rehabilitation had a Cochrane review undertaken in 2015. A Cochrane review is a systematic review that looks at all the previous research published across the world and amalgamates it see if overall the treatment is working. The researchers pooled 39 scientific studies including more than 2440 patients and conclude

“ There is moderate to strong evidence that vestibular rehabilitation is a safe, effective management for unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction, based on a number of high-quality randomized controlled trials. There is moderate evidence that vestibular rehabilitation resolves symptoms and improves functioning in the medium term”

This is great news for anybody struggling with balance problems. If you or somebody you know has problems with dizziness and vertigo and thinks they might benefit from vestibular rehabilitation therapy – get in contact with a specialist physiotherapy clinic today.

PRP Therapy Can Relieve Osteoarthritis Pain

For people suffering from osteoarthritis, even the most common day to day tasks – driving, walking, climbing stairs, can become challenging. While physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications can provide relief in mild cases, total joint replacement surgery may be required for severe cases. Surgery puts patients at risk and requires a long and painful recovery period.

If you suffer from severe osteoarthritis in hip or knee joints and have been thinking of surgery, here is a highly effective alternative you should consider – Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy.

PRP Therapy

Platelets are blood cells that help in clotting. In case of damage to a blood vessel, platelets create a clot at the site of the damage to stop the bleeding and allow healing.

PRP therapy uses a patient’s own platelets to promote healing in the damaged joint. It is a quick and safe procedure.

Blood is drawn from the patient and spun in a centrifuge. This separates the platelets from other blood cells. These platelets are directly injected into the damaged joint. The entire process is done as an outpatient procedure and takes about an hour.

Your orthopedic doctor may prescribe physical therapy regimen for weeks following the injection. You would be asked to come back for an evaluation after six weeks. A second injection is necessary, in some cases. In successful cases, you would be able to comfortably resume activities that arthritis had previously made too painful, within 3 months of the injection.

PRP therapy has also shown to be highly effective in treating osteoarthritis, tendonitis, lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow), and patellar tendonitis (jumper’s knee).

To learn more about PRP Therapy, call the top Orthopedic surgeon in Gilbert, AZ, call OSPI Arizona at 480-899-4333. OSPI’s Board Certified orthopedic surgeons have extensive experience and expertise in sports medicine, general orthopedics and joint replacement surgery.

 

Busting 4 Common Myths about PRP Therapy

PRP or Platelet Rich Plasma therapy is a regenerative medicine procedure that is being used to treat a wide range of problems involving the joints, tendons, ligaments, muscle, connective tissue and cartilage.

PRP refers to blood plasma derived from the person’s own blood. PRP therapy can be used for the treatment of various injuries and degenerative conditions, promoting a healing response at the site of injection.

If you are considering PRP therapy or wondering whether it will work for you, it is important to be educated about the treatment. Here are 4 common myths about PRP therapy and the truth about them.

PRP therapy is Risky

On the contrary, PRP therapy is a minimally-invasive, low-risk treatment that has minimal side effects. Since your own blood cells and platelets are utilized, there is no chance of rejection or infection.

PRP treatment is Lengthy

PRP therapy can, in fact, speed up recovery. The procedure takes up to about an hour or two and does not have any downtime. Usually, 3 PRP injections are given in a 3-week period. Most patients start noticing relief in the injured area after the second injection.

Too Young for PRP

There is no fixed age to undergo PRP therapy, but it is commonly used for adults who are suffering from degenerative conditions and painful injuries. Your doctor at OSPI, Arizona can help you understand whether you are a good candidate for PRP therapy.

PRP is Expensive

Typically, regenerative medicine treatments are expensive. But PRP therapy is one of the more cost-effective procedures. PRP therapy helps you avoid the need for surgery and allows your body to heal naturally. Most patients recover quickly with positive results, making PRP therapy a treatment worth trying.

To learn more about PRP Therapy in Gilbert, AZ, call the best orthopedic surgeon at OSPI Arizona at Chandler, AZ at 480-899-4333.

Who is considered for a Knee Replacement Surgery?

One of the most common reasons for considering a knee replacement surgery is severe osteoarthritis of the knees. Patients with knee joint damage due to trauma, people with stiff knees, rheumatoid arthritis and traumatic arthritis may also be recommended for knee replacement. However, knee replacement becomes an option only if conservative treatments have failed to provide pain relief.

Need for Knee Surgery

The recommendation for a knee replacement surgery is made only after the knee surgeon has made a physical examination of knee joints, assessed X-ray reports and other scans and talked to the patient about severity of pain, extent of damage and the mobility and stability of the joints.

Risks Involved

While modern technology and advancements in medicine have made total knee replacement surgery quite safe, there are a few risks associated with it. One risk is the formation of blood clots in the legs, which can cause pulmonary embolism. Stiffness of the joint or nerve damage are the other associated risks. Discuss these risks and any questions you may have in your mind, before you say yes to knee replacement surgery.

Knee Implant

After a knee replacement surgery, which involves implanting a prosthesis to replace the damaged part of the joint, and rehabilitation and physical therapy, you can expect significant pain relief and restoration of function and motion. You can go back to a normal life, walking and going about your day, with much ease.

If you are looking for the best knee replacement doctors, call the top knee doctor in Gilbert AZ, at OSPI Arizona at 480-899-4333.

Stories of Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal Neuralgia“When an attack actually happens, it feels like you’ve been placed into an electric chair for about five minutes. It feels like your face is being scraped off, acid being thrown on it, and it’s a burning, searing sensation that will travel on my whole right side,”

These are the words of Tim Haynes – who recently talked to Daily-Journal.com about his struggles with the severe facial pain disease Trigeminal Neuralgia.

“You can’t see it. You can’t tell it’s there until you live with it,” Haynes said. “It’s a life-changing, debilitating disease, and you wouldn’t want your worst of the worst enemies to have it. … And I don’t have it nearly as bad as a lot of people that have it.”

Amy Cook is another young sufferer of the disease. At just 21 she is also plagued by the sharp stabbing pains. She talked to the Daily Mail saying

“It has almost taken over my life in a sense because when it’s really bad I cannot function.”

From Johannesburg in South Africa, Amy said

“I have decided to raise awareness of it. It made me happy to know that I was not alone in this rare condition.”

What is Trigeminal neuralgia?

Trigeminal neuralgia is a disease whereby the trigeminal nerve that supplies the sensation to the face comes into contact with blood vessels in the brain. When this happens, the nerve is stimulated and it shoots signals off to the brain that tell the central nervous system there is severe injury happening to the face. As such patients feel a shooting electric intense pain for just a few seconds. This happens periodically as the blood vessel touches up against the nerve.

How can trigeminal Neuralgia be treated

Is there any hope for Amy, Tim and the others afflicted with this rare disease? In fact, there is. Treatments are currently available and recent reports suggest new drugs are on the horizon. However, people need specialist help to get the treatment they desperately need. Treatments can include:

● Avoiding triggers. This seems simple but specialists can often provide invaluable tips and tricks to avoid the shooting pains. Knowing what triggers the pain, like a scarf touching your chin or the blowing of the wind can help patients avoid these situations
● Epilepsy drugs are the major treatment options. Anticonvulsants, as they are often called, were not originally intended to treat pain but they calm activity in the nerves and as such work well in conditions like trigeminal neuralgia. The most commonly used is Carbamazepine – which is effective in lots of patients. Others, however, are available such as pregabalin and baclofen.

If you or somebody you know are suffering from sharpshooting facial pains then consider getting in contact with a specialist clinic to help relieve their condition. Often family doctors are ill-equipped to deal with this rare and debilitating disorder and specialist help can often make all the difference.

When Athletes Suffer from Hip Labral Tears

Is it game over when an athlete suffers from a labral tear in the hip? Many athletes have found themselves in the unenviable position of having to consider surgery when a labral tear has occurred. Although there are treatments to consider, professional athletes are very aware of the significance of such an injury. As a prime example, British tennis star Andy Murray had to make the decision recently to have surgery on his hip and even with a favorable result, it is unlikely that he will be able to compete at the top level for a while.

Approximately one-fifth of all athletes who suffer from groin pain have hip labral tears and require treatment to help heal the injuries to the acetabular labrum surrounding the hip socket. There’s no doubt that treatment including arthroscopic techniques have certainly improved surgical options and there are regenerative curative treatments available too, so, it is a far more favorable outlook these days. When an athlete, professional or not, has tried various treatments including rest and physical therapy but, is still unable to compete after six months, the diagnosis is likely to be a labral tear and articular cartilage damage.

This is a painful injury and it causes great discomfort also restricting movement. The labrum serves to seal the joint of the hip and to provide stability and cushioning. Hip labral tears occur when partial or complete damage has occurred although compression or traction injuries will happen.

Hip Labral TearSymptoms of a hip labral tear include:

  • Groin pain
  • Pain in the front of the hip
  • Stiffness in the hip joint
  • Grating or locking feeling within the hip
  • Restricted movement
  • Reduced stability of the hip
  • Radiating pain to the buttocks

Frustratingly, it can be difficult to determine the actual cause but could include:

  • Stress, pressure or excessive force to the area
  • Dislocated hip
  • Degeneration of the hip
  • Microtrauma affecting the capsular tissue
  • Hypermobility
  • Structural abnormalities
  • Direct trauma – falling and landing on the hip, etc.

Anyone who participates actively in sporting events could find themselves suffering from this type of hip injury.

Medical advice is essential.

For any athlete, this is the type of diagnosis that is most unwelcome. There’s no doubt that following this type of surgery, athletes will make an incredible recovery, but delays are unavoidable. It takes time for fitness, strength, and mobility to be regained.

A diagnosis is made through movement of the hip joint and placing the leg in different postures. Where there is a limited range of motion, this is often indicative of a labrum hip tear, but, x-rays or MRI scans can help to confirm whether injury to the soft tissues has occurred.

Medication can help to ease the inflammation, and this is a good starting point. Often, cortisone injections are used which provide pain relief and then, physical therapy can increase strength and stability while reducing stress on the joint. Treatment is likely to include strengthening workouts with massage therapy.

Stem cell surgery has also been found to be highly effective when it comes to treating these types of injury and should certainly be considered when physical therapy and anti-inflammatory treatments does not ensure full recovery.  Treatment will depend on the exact diagnosis and on the patient’s needs, but recovery potential is typically good.

Shoulder Instability Causes and Treatment

The shoulder joint possesses a wider range of motion as compared to any other joint in the human body. But this mobility comes with a price – less stability.

This article shares all you need to know about shoulder instability, its causes and treatment options.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a condition affecting the GH or Glenohumeral joint of your shoulder. If you are wondering what it means, the GH joint is where the collar bone, shoulder blade and the upper arm bone come together. When the tissue holding the upper arm bone in place fails to keep the bone in place, it causes shoulder instability.

The GH joint is a ball-and-socket joint but the socket is much shallower than that in the hip joint, allowing the GH joint very little bony support. It depends upon ligaments and tendons for stability. When one or more of these is damaged, the head of the humerus may start moving too freely and slip out of the socket, resulting in shoulder instability.

Causes of Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability can be the result of –

  • direct trauma, for example, falling onto an outstretched arm which can cause dislocation or tears in shoulder ligaments
  • congenital problems
  • repetitive strain and chronic overuse can stretch and weaken the shoulder’s ligaments and tendons, leading to instability

Pain, clicking or popping feeling, numbness during movement and tenderness are common symptoms of shoulder instability.

Treatment for Shoulder Instability

There is no common treatment for cases of shoulder instability. Treatment options would vary depending upon the severity of the underlying conditions and the intensity of pain or disability.

Conservative measures include physician-directed physical therapy and exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and activity modification.

For severe cases, surgery may be required. Two types of surgery are commonly used for the treatment of shoulder instability.

  • Capsular Shift Surgery – This is an option when the joint capsule is too large. The surgeon makes a ‘tuck’ in the connective tissue which heals together, making a tighter joint capsule that holds the joint stable.
  • Bankart Repair Surgery – This is done when the joint has suffered damage to the connective tissue. The surgery repairs the ligaments that stabilize the shoulder.

Both these procedures can be done in a minimally invasive manner, causing less soft tissue trauma, less pain after surgery, and for many patients, faster recovery times.

If you or a loved one is suffering from shoulder pain, stiffness, tenderness or numbness, consult a shoulder orthopedic surgeon immediately for an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment. Any delay in treatment may worsen your condition and reduce treatment options.

To learn more about shoulder arthritis or to consult the top orthopedic surgeon in Chandler, AZ, call OSPI Arizona at 480-899-4333.

Could Texting Cause Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Have you ever felt a numbness, tingling or shooting pain in your hands? If so you might be one of millions of people worldwide who suffer with Carpal Tunnel syndrome. The causes of Carpal Tunnel have long been contested, and previously doctors argues that it might be caused by “overuse” of the wrist – ie people sat still at a desk typing all day. New research points the finger at our smartphone addiction, with a possible link between smartphone use and Carpal tunnel recently being reported by the DailyMail and CNN after research in Hong Kong found a link.

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Due to textingWhat is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

 

The carpal tunnel is a small passageway in your wrist that the median nerve travels through. It is thought that this passageway can become compressed and in turn compress the median nerve. This results in a number of symptoms such as:

 

  • Pins and needles in your hand (known to medical professionals as paresthesia)
  • Thumb Weakness (the median nerve controls your thumb)
  • A dull ache in your hand

 

Could Carpal Tunnel Be Linked with texting?

 

The study, published in the Journal Muscle and Nerve asked a small number of patients (48_ to fill out questionnaires on their wrist pain before taking tests to see whether they has numbness and tingling – the classic symptoms of carpal tunnel. They found that patients who used their devices for 4-5 hours a day or more often had enlarged median nerves (seen in carpal tunnel) and had more pain in their wrists.

 

The director of Arthritis Research UK talked to the DailyMail, and said of the results

 

‘Previously we only saw this type of repetitive strain injury in people using a mouse and keyboard at work.

‘Now we have these new repetitive movements, swiping and tapping, in our leisure time, as people are barely ever without their smartphones and tablets.

‘This is a real new challenge for the 21st century and I would encourage anyone suffering symptoms of burning and tingling to contact their GP promptly.”

 

He also noted that the sample size of the study was small – and more research is needed.

 

What Can Be Done About Carpal Tunnel?

 

A number of specialist clinics across the united states can provide excellent care if you think you are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. The treatments usually include the following:

 

  • Self Care: Take it easy – rest up! If you are over using a keyboard then stop!
  • Medication: Drugs like Ibuprofen can reduce swelling and inflammation in the nerve and reduce pain
  • A splint or brace: These can be bought cheaply online and keep the wrist in a position that doesn’t hurt.
  • Steroid injection: Corticosteroids can be injected right into the wrist – these are much more powerful than simple painkillers.
  • Surgery: Some clinics will offer a surgery that opens up the roof of the passageway (the carpal tunnel) and reduces pressure on the median nerve.

 

If you or someone you know are suffering from carpal tunnel, contact a specialist clinic today.

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